Title of Activity
Character comparison

 

Description of educational activity
Duration: 45 minutes
Pupils’ age: 15-19
Organization of the class of pupils: group work

The aim of the lesson: The aim of this activity is to develop reading literacy of students, encourage their reading skills, use of their competences at the analysis and interpretation of the initial texts, to strengthen their language skills at verbalisation of their finding and to expand the vocabulary of students. It is important to be able to present the findings, express student´s opinion and to be able to accept the opinions of other members of a group or class.

The aim of the activity is to create student´s own text – comparative characteristic of the main characters of the selected stories, based on the analysis and his reading experience. The next aim is to develop analytical mind of the students.

 

Support materials:

Teacher – a coordinator of the activity, chooses some short excerpts from two books (equal number of the excerpts from each book), which somehow characterize the main character of a story. Each excerpt is printed on a separate piece of paper without indicating the author and the title of a book. The examples of suitable excerpts are shown in this activity and we chose them from the books The shock of the fall (N. Filer) and The perks of being a wallflower (S. Chbosky), because the heroes of both of the stories are similar in their age, attitudes and their life situation.

 

 

Activities:

  1. Divide students into groups as follows: Put numbered pieces of papers into a hat and each student chooses one of them. There are more pieces of paper with the same number so we can make groups of student randomly. Students with number 1 will form a group, with number 2 another one etc.
  2. Each group is given excerpts from both of the books. Their first task is to read them and divide them into two groups/ two stories. The students can choose the form of reading so they can read individually or reading our loud with listening actively.
  3. Based on the excerpts, the students fill in the worksheet (appendix 2), so they match the main characters with the adjectives and phraseological expressions which characterize them. They choose their own form of work within a group. A thorough analysis of the excerpts is important, so the students do not only analyse the content but have to focus on intertextual links and author´s stylistics.
  4. After the adequate analysis of the characters, the groups work out a comparative characteristic of the main characters. They try to find the differences and similarities of the main characters.
  5. Subsequently the groups present their characteristics and discuss obtained information, compare their findings. Within the discussion they might change their opinion on a character.
  6. A teacher should now introduce the authors of the books to the students e.g. using a PowerPoint presentation. If there is no time to carry out this part of the activity, it can be left out as it is not the focus of the activity. The teacher is, in all the phases of the activity, a coordinator and facilitator of the activity.
  7. In the end the students watch a short part of the film versions of the books and discuss the differences. 

 

Connection to curriculum

Grade: 2nd and 3rd grade of bilingual studies

Bilingual curriculum: The study of literature is focused during the second and third year on reading comprehension of literary texts which are based on the interests of the students which involves books with teenage protagonists, too. The aim of the curriculum is to teach students to w0ork with the text, to analyse the texts. Comparing different characters and being able to talk about their features and analysing their qualities and vices. Understanding texts, weighing their merits, and utilizing the information they offer are skills that teenagers draw on throughout the curriculum.

 

Knowledge:

  • Students understand a text being read.
  • Students find the main character in a text.
  • They differentiate supporting characters from the main character.
  • After reading the excerpts they can identify the main characteristics of the characters.
  • They identify the topic of the excerpts
  • They select information.

 

Skills:

  • Students analyse texts.
  • They work with dictionaries.
  • They search for and classify information.
  • They can identify and interpret correctly the feelings of the characters in the books
  • They can put the particular excerpts in the correct order according to some links.
  • They are able to work in groups.
  • They can create a characteristic of a character based on the excerpts.

 

Competences:

  • Students are able to work individually or in a team
  • They accept others in the group
  • They can express their opinion

 

Bibliographic reference to be used during the activity

Filer Nathan: The shock of the fall

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers

ISBN: 9780007491452

Page count: 320

Year of issue: 2014

 

Digital sources

Reviews:

 

Results

The expected outcomes of the lesson are:

  • The students will be able to understand through character comparison, develop demonstrations.
  • To connect ideas and themes across texts.
  • To find hints to help to find the qualities of characters
  • To offer observations, make connections, speculate, interpret, and raise questions in response to the excerpts.

 

Recommendations

Both the teaching method and the text can help in increasing students’ interest in reading. These excerpts promote male characters with whom boys can identify. But the text is about teenage characters so girls can be interested in the reading as well as they are sentimental or even a little bit romantic. But on the other hand these books have deeper messages.

The teacher monitors the students so as to make sure they cooperate effectively.

The volume of given fragments of books can be adapted to the potential of a group - fragments can be shorter - by cutting less important paragraphs, or be expanded to additional fragments of the same novel.

Book title
The shock of the fall

 

Author
Nathan Filer

 

Bibliographic information
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
ISBN: 978-0007491452

 

Links (adaptations, reviews, full texts etc.)

Theme
The theme of loss, grief and mental illness

 

Short summary
The Shock of the Fall by Nathan Filer, tells the story of Matthew and Simon, two brothers who are separated yet united by a tragic accident. While they are on vacation with their parents, Matthew Homes and his older brother snuck out in the middle of the night. Only Matthew came home safely. Ten years later, Matthew tells us, he has found a way to bring his brother back. The book is full of grief, loss and Matthew suffers from a mental disease. It’s a very unusual narrative, but also both funny and inventive. The book describes the close bonds between the main character and his grandmother.

 

Why is the story appropriate for the targeted groups of RSP readers?

  1. it reflects readers´ interests
  2. the recommendation and the report emerged from the survey results

 

What are the distinguished readers interests reflected by this book/story?
-

 

Why is this story motivational for the pupils?
The story deals with suffering and grief and how close family bonds can help overcome all the problems. The story reveals the problems of a boy who suffers from Schizophrenia.

 

Is there a historical, political, multi/inter cultural, migrant or similar context recognized in this book/story? 
No.

 

Is there a principle of inclusion reflected in this book/story and does it promotes understanding of cultural diversities and heritage? 
It emphasizes the importance of family bonds and the bonds between siblings.

Title of Activity
Character comparison

Description of educational activity
Duration: 45 minutes
Pupils’ age: 15-19
Organization of the class of pupils: group work

The aim of the lesson: The aim of this activity is to develop reading literacy of students, encourage their reading skills, use of their competences at the analysis and interpretation of the initial texts, to strengthen their language skills at verbalisation of their finding and to expand the vocabulary of students. It is important to be able to present the findings, express student´s opinion and to be able to accept the opinions of other members of a group or class.

The aim of the activity is to create student´s own text – comparative characteristic of the main characters of the selected stories, based on the analysis and his reading experience. The next aim is to develop analytical mind of the students.

 

 

Support materials:

Teacher – a coordinator of the activity, chooses some short excerpts from two books (equal number of the excerpts from each book), which somehow characterize the main character of a story. Each excerpt is printed on a separate piece of paper without indicating the author and the title of a book. The examples of suitable excerpts are shown in this activity and we chose them from the books. The shock of the fall (N. Filer) and The perks of being a wallflower (S. Chbosky), because the heroes of both of the stories are similar in their age, attitudes and their life situation.

 

Activities:

  1. Divide students into groups as follows: Put numbered pieces of papers into a hat and each student chooses one of them. There are more pieces of paper with the same number so we can make groups of student randomly. Students with number 1 will form a group, with number 2 another one etc.
  2. Each group is given excerpts from both of the books. Their first task is to read them and divide them into two groups/ two stories. The students can choose the form of reading so they can read individually or reading our loud with listening actively.
  3. Based on the excerpts, the students fill in the worksheet (appendix 2), so they match the main characters with the adjectives and phraseological expressions which characterize them. They choose their own form of work within a group. A thorough analysis of the excerpts is important, so the students do not only analyse the content but have to focus on intertextual links and author´s stylistics.
  4. After the adequate analysis of the characters, the groups work out a comparative characteristic of the main characters. They try to find the differences and similarities of the main characters.
  5. Subsequently the groups present their characteristics and discuss obtained information, compare their findings. Within the discussion they might change their opinion on a character.
  6. A teacher should now introduce the authors of the books to the students e.g. using a PowerPoint presentation. If there is no time to carry out this part of the activity, it can be left out as it is not the focus of the activity. The teacher is, in all the phases of the activity, a coordinator and facilitator of the activity.
  7. In the end the students watch a short part of the film versions of the books and discuss the differences. 

 

Connection to curriculum

Grade: 2nd and 3rd grade of bilingual studies

Bilingual curriculum: The study of literature is focused during the second and third year on reading comprehension of literary texts which are based on the interests of the students which involves books with teenage protagonists, too. The aim of the curriculum is to teach students to w0ork with the text, to analyse the texts. Comparing different characters and being able to talk about their features and analysing their qualities and vices. Understanding texts, weighing their merits, and utilizing the information they offer are skills that teenagers draw on throughout the curriculum.

 

Knowledge:

  • Students understand a text being read.
  • Students find the main character in a text.
  • They differentiate supporting characters from the main character.
  • After reading the excerpts they can identify the main characteristics of the characters.
  • They identify the topic of the excerpts
  • They select information.

 

Skills:

  • Students analyse texts.
  • They work with dictionaries.
  • They search for and classify information.
  • They can identify and interpret correctly the feelings of the characters in the books
  • They can put the particular excerpts in the correct order according to some links.
  • They are able to work in groups.
  • They can create a characteristic of a character based on the excerpts.

 

Competences:

  • Students are able to work individually or in a team
  • They accept others in the group
  • They can express their opinion

 

Bibliographic reference to be used during the activity

Chbosky Stephen: The perks of being a wallflower

Publisher: Pocket Books

ISBN: 9781847394071

Page count: 224

Year of issue: 2012

 

Digital sources

The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a 2012 American coming-of-age, drama film.  An adaptation of the 1999 epistolary novel of the same name, it was written and directed by the novel's author, Stephen Chbosky. Filmed in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the film was released on September 21, 2012. The film stars Logan Lerman, Emma Watson and Ezra Miller.

 

Results

The expected outcomes of the lesson are:

  • The students will be able to understand through character comparison, develop demonstrations.
  • To connect ideas and themes across texts.
  • To find hints to help to find the qualities of characters
  • To offer observations, make connections, speculate, interpret, and raise questions in response to the excerpts.

 

Recommendations

Both the teaching method and the text can help in increasing students’ interest in reading. These excerpts promote male characters with whom boys can identify. But the text is about teenage characters so girls can be interested in the reading as well as they are sentimental or even a little bit romantic. But on the other hand these books have deeper messages.

The teacher monitors the students so as to make sure they cooperate effectively.

The volume of given fragments of books can be adapted to the potential of a group - fragments can be shorter - by cutting less important paragraphs, or be expanded to additional fragments of the same novel.

Book title
The perks of being a wallflower

 

Author
Stephen Chbosky

 

Bibliographic information
Publisher: Simon and Schuster Australia Sydney
ISBN: 978-1-84739-407-1

 

Links (adaptations, reviews, full texts etc.)

 

Theme
Friends help shape your identity

 

Short summary
Fifteen-year old Charlie lost his friend who committed a suicide. He is anxious of starting high school alone and he starts to write letters to a stranger. At school, Charlie finds a friend and mentor in his English teacher, Bill. After meeting a classmate Patrik and his sister Sam he overcomes shyness and they have become two of Charlie's BFFs. During the course of the school year, Charlie has his first date and his first kiss, he deals with bullies, he makes friends, loses them, and gains them back. Charlie has a relatively stable home life. Unfortunately, a disturbing family secret that Charlie has repressed for his entire life surfaces at the end of the school year. Charlie has a severe mental breakdown and ends up hospitalized. Charlie's final letter closes with feelings of hope.

 

Why is the story appropriate for the targeted groups of RSP readers?

  1. it reflects readers´ interests
  2. the recommendation and the report emerged from the survey results

 

What are the distinguished readers interests reflected by this book/story?
-

 

Why is this story motivational for the pupils?
"The story deals with problems of a teenager who has to face difficult situations. Anxiety and depression are common among teenagers and the book can be motivational and can help teenagers to understand that friendship and family are essential when trying to find a solution."

 

Is there a historical, political, multi/inter cultural, migrant or similar context recognized in this book/story? 
No.

 

Is there a principle of inclusion reflected in this book/story and does it promotes understanding of cultural diversities and heritage? 
It has the principle of inclusion. It promotes understanding of belonging. It emphasizes the importance of being part of the school society and the importance of the role of the families.

Title of Activity
The kite runner

 

Description of educational activity
Duration: 45 minutes
Pupils’ age: 15-19
Organization of the class of pupils: group work

The aim of the lesson: The aim of the activity is to develop reading literacy of pupils, to support their reading skills, to use their competencies to analyse and compare source texts, to reinforce their language skills when verbalizing their findings, to develop their vocabulary. The ability to present their findings, their opinions and the ability to accept opinions of the other members of the group are important here.

The aim of the activity is to be able to understand the chosen excerpts from the book, to understand the nature and depth of the excerpts from the book. To be able to find connections between the book and the real world. To be able to analyse and accept multicultural differences between the countries. One of the aims is to improve the analytical thinking of our students and to support the tolerance of other cultures and nations.

 

Support materials:

Some short excerpts of a book are chosen, e.g. 3 of 4 (see appendix 1) Each student is given all of them. The excerpts which show a personality of characters or socio-political situation are appropriate. Because the story takes place in Afghanistan, a few questions about a current situation in the country can be prepared. It is advisable to prepare some information about the author of the book.

  1. First excerpt: page 26 - 27 (There was a pomegranate tree………. Enough for a harmless prank.)
  2. First excerpt: 43-44 (I wished I too had some kind of scar ………..Because that was the winter that Hassan stopped smiling.)
  1. Third excerpt: 100-101 (But it rained the afternoon Baba took Ali……..that the life I had known since I´d been born was over)

 

Activities:

  1. The author and the book are introduced. The texts are handed out.
  2. Each text is read out loud. After each part there is a discussion. Students are explained some possible problematic parts either lexical or connected with the meaning (e.g. loans). All the texts are analysed.
  3. After that students are divided in to six groups. Each group is given a different task, A0 piece of paper and colourful markers. The results of their findings are written down on the pieces of paper

Tasks for different groups:
First group - Annotation

Students have to write a summary of the story (excerpts). They try to create an annotation of the book based on the excerpts.

Second group – Portraits

The aim is to work out characteristics of the characters mentioned in the excerpts. They have to find key words which characterise the characters and to think about relationships between them and define them.

Third group – Connector

This group tries to find the connection of the story with the outside world, so everything that connects the story with the outside world. Students have to find out the time/period when the story takes place, socio-historical events which could influence the story and to think about the author´s link to the story.

Fourth group – Word masters

This group tries to find the words or phrases which are new, unknown for students or the words which are for some reasons interesting for them. They write them down and explain their choice. They also register the paragraph, line in which they found the word.

Fifth group – Interesting passages

Students try to find the passages which are interesting for them and explain why they chose them. They may be the passages which contain information which surprised students, which students consider to be important or funny. Students try to describe emotions awaken by those passages.

Sixth group – Cultural context

The group think about the cultural differences between the country they live in and the country where the story takes place. They explain the differences. The Internet can be used here.

  1. After the time limit the individual groups present their results. Students can ask the present group questions or they can add some information. In the end a teachers sums up all the findings.

 

Evaluation and assessment method:

  • Throughout the lesson, ensure that your students are backing up their choices with accurate supporting details.
  • Teacher's observations of student preparedness, student work samples, and participation in group activities.

 

Effect of the activity on RSP reading:  

Practices that support students´ choice, collaboration, and shared control of learning outcomes can be linked to self-expressed interest in reading and engaged reading behaviours.

Teachers can organize reading instruction to develop self-efficiency, competence, and engagement in teenage students.

 

Connection to curriculum

Grade: 3rd and 4th grade of bilingual studies

Bilingual curriculum: The study of literature is focused during the second year on reading comprehension of literary texts which are more serious and are dealing with deeper ideas, e.g. multiculturalism, intolerance. The students should be able to understand the influence of the author´s cultural background on the story. The aim of the curriculum is to teach students to work with the text, to analyse the texts and to understand the importance of the cultural and historical backgrounds. Understanding texts, weighing their merits, and utilizing the information they offer are skills that teenagers draw on throughout the curriculum.

 

Knowledge:

  • Students understand a text being read.
  • Students find characters in the text and they differentiate supporting characters from the main character.
  • After reading the excerpts they can identify the main characteristics of the characters.
  • They identify the narrator of the story.
  • They identify the topic of the excerpts.
  • They select information.

 

Skills:

  • Students analyse texts.
  • They work with different sources of information.
  • They search for and classify information.
  • They can identify and interpret correctly the feelings of the characters in the books
  • They can put the particular excerpts in the correct order according to some links.
  • They are able to work in groups.
  • They can create a characteristic of a character based on the excerpts.
  • They can complete the tasks successfully

 

Competences:

  • They can identify and interpret correctly the feelings of the characters in the books
  • They are able to work in groups and individually, too.
  • They can accept other members of the group
  • They  accept and understand the cultural differences between the nations and cultures
  • They can understand the emotions of the characters, they are emphatic.

 

Bibliographic reference to be used during the activity

Khaled Hosseini

The Kite Runner Publisher: Bloomsbury

ISBN: 9781408824856

Page count: 324

Year of issue: 2011

 

Digital sources

A number of adaptations were created following publication, including a 2007 film of the same name, several stage performances, and a graphic novel.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0419887/

Graphic novel: https://mrkmpsc.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/the-kite-runner-graphic-novel.pdf

 

Results

The expected outcomes of the lesson are:

  • The students will be able to understand through different cultures, they will be able to compare cultures, cultural elements, traditions and hence they will be able to understand the text from different perspectives. The ability to develop demonstrations will be enhanced.
  • To connect ideas and themes across texts.
  • To offer observations, make connections, speculate, interpret, and raise questions in response to the excerpts.

 

Recommendations

Both the teaching method and the text can help in increasing students’ interest in reading. This text promotes two male characters but from a different cultures and they belong to different social classes. The teacher monitors the students so as to make sure they cooperate effectively. The volume of given fragments of books can be adapted to the potential of a group - fragments can be shorter - by cutting less important paragraphs, or be expanded to additional fragments of the same novel.

Book title
The Kite runner

 

Author
Khaled Hosseini

 

Bibliographic information

Publisher: Bloomsbury

ISBN:9781408824856

 

Links (adaptations, reviews, full texts etc.)

 

Theme
A book about friendship, war, love

 

Short summary
It is a heart-breaking story of the unusual friendship between a wealthy boy and the son of his father’s servant, The Kite Runner is a novel set in a country that is in the process of being destroyed. It is about the power of reading, the price of betrayal, and the possibility of redemption; and an exploration of the power of fathers over sons—their love, their sacrifices, their lies.

 

Why is the story appropriate for the targeted groups of RSP readers?

  1. It reflects readers´ interests
  2. The recommendation and the report emerged from the survey results
  3. reflects political/historical moment
  4. it promotes understanding of cultural diversities and heritage
  5. refers to actual migrant situation

 

What are the distinguished readers interests reflected by this book/story?
-

Why is this story motivational for the pupils?
The story describes two types of relationship - father and son, friendship between two boys from different classes set in the time when a war starts and people lose everything. The book teaches student about the power of friendship and the price of betrayal. Students are encouraged to understand the reason why some people are forced to leave their country.

 

Is there a historical, political, multi/inter cultural, migrant or similar context recognized in this book/story? 
Yes - the main character is forced to leave his country because of the war in his country and has to cope with a new situation and culture.

 

Is there a principle of inclusion reflected in this book/story and does it promotes understanding of cultural diversities and heritage? 
The book shows us the importance of the family and friends in our life. It shows us how important our culture and identity are for all of us.

Title of Activity
The fun they had

 

Description of educational activity
Duration: 90 minutes
Pupils’ age: 15-19
Organization of the class of pupils: group work

The aim of the lesson: The aim of the activity is to develop reading literacy of pupils, to support their reading skills, to use their competencies to analyse the source text, to compare the present based on their experience and the future based on the text, to reinforce their language skills when verbalizing the results of their work.

 

Support materials:

  • A collage of pictures representing different books.
  • A short story – The fun they had. Each student is given a copy of it. 
  • A sheet of paper, pencils, colour pencils for each group.

 

Activities:

  1. Warm up activity (competition) – students work in groups. Each group is given a collage of pictures representing different books. Their task is to find as many books as they can.
  • Fire - Kristine Cashore
  • Harry Potter and the cursed child – J.K.Rowling
  • The fault in our stars – John Green
  • The catcher in the rye – J.D. Salinger
  • The hunger games – Suzanne Collins
  • The maze Runner – James Dashner
  • City of bones – Cassandra Clare
  • Red Queen – Victoria Aveyard
  • Throne of glass – Sarah J. Maas
  • The kite runner – Khaled Hosseini
  • Twilight – Stephanie Meyer
  • A clockwork orange – Anthony Burgess
  • The Hobbit – J.R. Tolkien
  • Ann of Green Gables ( - L.M. Montgomery)
  • Lord of the flies – William Golding
  • Paper towns – John Green
  • Thirteen reasons why – Jay Asher
  • The princess diaries series – Meg Cabot
  • The chocolate war – Robert Cormier
  • Stardust – Neil Gaiman
  • Prince of Thorns – Mark Laurence
  • Metro 2033 – Dimitry Glukhovsky
  • Precious stones – Kerstin Gler
  • Little women – Louisa May Alcott
  • The last wish – Andrzej Sapkowski
  • The sun is also a star – Nicola Yoon
  • The picture of Dorian Gray – Oscar Wilde
  • Inkheart – Cornelia Funke
  • A thousand splendid suns – Khaled Hosseini
  1. The texts are handed out. The students read the short story.
  2. The students discuss the story which shows us how the future education will probably look like. They can express what they like or do not like about this type of education
  3. After that students are divided in to groups. Each group is given a piece of paper and colourful markers. Their task is to draw a comic. The students will set the characters from the story in to the present school. They will try to depict their feelings about the present school system.
  4. The students will present the results of their work.

 

Connection to curriculum

Grade: 2nd grade of bilingual studies

Bilingual curriculum: The study of literature is focused during the second year on reading comprehension of literary texts which are based on the interests of the students which involves fantasy, too. The aim of the curriculum is to teach students to work with the text, to analyse the texts. Understanding texts, weighing their merits, and utilizing the information they offer are skills that teenagers draw on throughout the curriculum.

 

Knowledge:

  • Students understand a text being read.
  • Students find characters in the text and can describe them
  • After reading the story they can identify the advantages and disadvantages of the present and future school system.
  • They select information.

 

Skills:

  • Students analyse the text.
  • They work with different sources of information.
  • They search for and classify information.
  • They can identify and interpret correctly the feelings of the characters in the story
  • They are able to work in groups.
  • They can create a characteristic of a character based on the story.
  • They can complete the tasks successfully

 

Competences:

  • They can identify and interpret correctly the feelings of the characters in the story
  • They are able to work in groups and individually, too.
  • They can accept other members of the group
  • They can understand the emotions of the characters, they are emphatic

 

Bibliographic reference to be used during the activity

The fun they had

Isaac Asimov

The Best of Isaac Asimov

Sphere, 1973

ISBN13: 9780722112540

336 pages

 

Digital sources

 

Results

The expected outcomes of the lesson are:

  • The students will be able to understand the text and to compare the present system of education to the future one.
  • To offer observations, make connections, speculate, interpret, and raise questions in response to the text.

 

Recommendations

Both the teaching method and the text can help in increasing students’ interest in reading. This text describes the possible future system of education and can help students to discuss its positives and negatives.

The teacher monitors the students so as to make sure they cooperate effectively.

Book title
The fun they had

 

Author
Isaac Asimov

 

Bibliographic information

Publisher: Doubleday

The Best of Isaac Asimov

ISBN: 978-0385050784

 

Links (adaptations, reviews, full texts etc.)

 

Theme
The things we take for granted because we don’t know more; we grow up with them and we don’t even imagine they can be different.

 

Short summary
Set in the year 2155 (2157 in some later versions), when children learn individually at home using a mechanical teacher, the story tells of eleven-year-old Margie Jones, whose neighbour Tommy finds a real book. The book tells about a time when children learned by age group in large schools that were not merely designated rooms in private houses as in the year 2157. Margie and Tommy discuss what it must have been like to study together with a real person as a teacher, and though at first Margie is skeptical about the notion, by the end of the story she daydreams about what it must have been like and 'the fun they had'.

 

Why is the story appropriate for the targeted groups of RSP readers?

  1. It reflects readers´ interests
  2. It’s highly motivational
  3. It reflects political/historical moment
  4. recommendations and the report emerged from the survey results                                             

 

What are the distinguished readers interests reflected by this book/story?
-

 

Why is this story motivational for the pupils?
The short story is a memory of traditional schools when students still visited schools. There is the irony that our students do not appreciate the possibility of visiting schools and having classmates.

 

Is there a historical, political, multi/inter cultural, migrant or similar context recognized in this book/story? 
The story depicts the future vision of schools and there is a comparison with the contemporary schools.

 

Is there a principle of inclusion reflected in this book/story and does it promotes understanding of cultural diversities and heritage? 
The short story shows that schools do not provide only education but relationships and cooperation with teachers and classmates can contribute to our personal development.

Book title
The Gypsy, But the Most Beautiful

 

Author
Kristian Novak

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bibliographic information

Kristian Novak: Ciganin, ali najljepši

Nakladnik: Naklada OceanMore (2016.)

ISBN 9789533320496

 

Links (adaptations, reviews, full texts etc.)

 

Theme
Contemporary. The mysterious murders and intricate investigations in Međimurje, the border region in the north of Croatia, with three major fabulous parts: the great and the tragic, the forbidden love of a Croatian woman and a Roma in  their settlements, the fate of a Kurdish refugee from Mosul and the investigation of a police inspector, a veteran of war.

 

Short summary
„The Gypsy, But the Most Beautiful" by Kristian Novak is a crime story, with an enigma, brutal killings of the unknown and an investigation. The four characters  tell the same story in confessional form in rashomon way. Milena, the middle -aged of woman from Međimurje, returns to her native village of Sabolščak after her marriage broke down and she got sacked. Her young lover, Roma, Sandokan, known as Sandi, tries to live somewhere in the limelight between his own and the 'whites', where neither his nor 'strangers' really truly accept him. He does not belong anywhere. Then there is Nuzat, a Kurd on a refugee journey  from Mosul, to Calais. On the hopeless journey, Nuzat loses money, health, humanity and freedom, not coming to that, almost mythical, Calais. And finally, there is Zagreb Police Inspector Plancic, a merciful opportunist. The novel covers broadly, the course of several lives will meet between the Drava and Mura streams. It brings two biographies "from the cradle to the grave", captures and reconstructs at least three cultural circles, giving strong psycho portraits of their four speakers and the abundance of mass psychology.

 

Why is the story appropriate for the targeted groups of RSP readers?
The theme is contemporary, from Croatian reality, understandable to a young reader with the attractive motifs of police investigation, exotic surroundings, social and political turmoil and passionate forbidden love.                                      

 

What are the distinguished readers interests reflected by this book/story?
Intertwined socio-historical, criminal, love, political motifs of, in accordance with the expressed interests in conducted surveys.

 

Why is this story motivational for the pupils?
The short story is a memory of traditional schools when students still visited schools. There is the irony that our students do not appreciate the possibility of visiting schools and having classmates.

 

Is there a historical, political, multi/inter cultural, migrant or similar context recognized in this book/story? 
The novel deals with several identities: one is the majority, the white one, the other is the minority, the Roma, the third is the Croatian, the fourth is the refugee, the Kurdish and the Arab. There are convincible descriptions of the Roma village, multicultural and intercultural clashes, refugee camps and troubled journeys to the unknown, as well as the atmosphere in Mosul, long lines of refugees crossing the rivers between Turkey and Greece, Greece and Macedonia ..., unusual meetings of migrants from the East and Roma minority in Medjimurje ...

 

Is there a principle of inclusion reflected in this book/story and does it promotes understanding of cultural diversities and heritage? 
The principle of inclusion is reflected throughout the novel, which strongly and deeply promotes the ideas of coexistence, support for differences and the different empathy, acceptance and understanding of cultural differences and the socio-historical heritage.

Book title
The Lord of the Rings – The Hobbit

 

Author
J. R. R. Tolkien

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bibliographic information

Paperback, 366 pages

Published: August 15th 2002 by Houghton Mifflin (first published September 21st 1937)

Original Title: The Hobbit : or There and Back Again

ISBN 0618260307 (ISBN13: 9780618260300)

Edition Language: English

Series: Middle-Earth Universe, The History of the Hobbit #1-2

 

Links (adaptations, reviews, full texts etc.)

 

Theme
The evolution and maturation of the protagonist, Bilbo Baggins, is central to the story. This journey of maturation, where Bilbo gains a clear sense of identity and confidence in the outside world, may be seen as a Bildungsroman rather than a traditional quest.

 

Short summary
The action begins when the wizard Gandalf and 13 patrons enter the house of Bilbo Bagins: Thorin Hrastoštit, Óin, Glóin (his son Gimli is one of the main figures in the Lord of the Rings), Dwalin, Balin (He was Gimli's cousin who was in Khazad-Dum), Bifur, Bofur, thick Bombur, brothers Feli and Kili, Dori, Nori and Ori). They persuade Bilbo to go with them on the voyage and soon move. Soon, the troupe is captured by Troy, but the Trolls fail to hide from the sun and become obscure. The fellow takes some of their treasures and goes to Rivendell. From there they move to Mount Erebor to kill the dragon Smaug. After leaving the Rivendell they were captured by the Goblins but failed to escape. During the run, Bilbo lost, and in the dark found the unique Ring. With the help of the eagles they manage to cross over the Misty Mountains, and come to the Beorn House. They then go to Mirkwood, where they captured King of the Thatcher of Thatcher. But once again, they escape to the wine barrels and go to Lake Town. In Lake Town they are supplied and moved to the mountains. Bilbo manages to steal the gold cup, and Smaug from the revenge attack on Jezergrad. Bard manages to kill the dragon. The congregation remains closed in the mountains, and the army of people from Lake Town, the viles of Mrkodol, and the dwarves from the Iron Mountain are moving treasured. The armies are preparing for the attack, but then the Orcs from the Maglena Mountains are attacked and they unite. With great losses, the Anti-Military Army wins and shares the treasures in equal parts. This battle is still called the battle of the five armies.

 

Why is the story appropriate for the targeted groups of RSP readers?

1. Appropriate for the target group of readers

2. Reflects readers interests

3. It is highly motivational

4. Recommendations and the report emerged from the survey results

                                   

What are the distinguished readers interests reflected by this book/story?
It is future oriented and guides the pupils in terms they can understand in both, their conscious and unconscious mind in order to relinquish their infantile dependency wishes and achieve a more stratifying independent existence. The wish-fulfillment element of fantasy both relieves anxiety and shows the child that personal success can be obtained, although at a certain price. At the heart of this lesson is the fact that the hero must work for his success. Magic accessories and good advice may be given to him, but he must use these aids actively and appropriately, and success often comes only after years of obscure labor or initial failure. Thus, the development of the hero is less a matter of change than of self-discovery.

 

Why is this story motivational for the pupils?

1. The Hobbit presents an intriguing variation on the usual quest narrative. The object of the expedition, Smaug's treasure, is not desired by the main character, Bilbo Baggins. The seeker is instead the obsessive dwarf Thorin Oakenshield. But Bilbo is also on a kind of quest. By joining the dwarves he hopes to prove to himself that he has inherited his grandfather's courage. While we would expect to find a brave-hearted fighter like Thorin venturing into a dragon's cave, Tolkien demonstrates that "a humble hero" may also be suited to such exploits.

2. The overcoming of greed and selfishness has been seen as the central moral of the story.

3. The Hobbit employs themes of animism. An important concept in anthropology and child development, animism is the idea that all things—including inanimate objects and natural events, such as storms or purses, as well as living things like animals and plants—possess human-like intelligence (John D. Rateliff calls this the "Doctor Dolittle Theme" in The History of the Hobbit, and cites the multitude of talking animals as indicative of this theme.

 

Is there a historical, political, multi/inter cultural, migrant or similar context recognized in this book/story? 

1. Tolkien wanted LOTR to read as history, an imagined slice of our planet's actual past.

2. Tolkien placed the modern problem of technology at the heart of his saga. He did believe that progress came at a price, and he doubted that modernism could satisfy the deeper yearnings of the human heart.

3. Personal growth and forms of heroism are central themes of the story, along with motifs of warfare. These themes have led critics to view Tolkien's own experiences during World War I as instrumental in shaping the story.

 

Is there a principle of inclusion reflected in this book/story and does it promotes understanding of cultural diversities and heritage? 
Tolkien's fantasy offers the possibility of active, serious participation by the reader in an imagined world, which heightens one’s sense of Self and Other. This participation depends not only on the reader’s intentions but also on the moral plausibility of the fantasy world. The reward for this participation is a sense of wonder that enables the reader to return to the "real" world with enhanced understanding and appreciation–either of the world itself or of his relation to it.

Book title
The Fault in Our Stars

 

Author
John Green

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bibliographic information

 

Links (adaptations, reviews, full texts etc.)

 

 

Theme
The book puts emphasis on the lives of the people who are seriously ill, insists that although their lives are short and full of pain, they can be  rich and of meaningful.. It strives to break the image that they are the heroes full of superhuman courage, bursting in anger and falling in pessimism. It rather  puts them into the ordinary teen life and making daily efforts to reconcile with ill-suffering.

 

Short summary
„The Fault in Our Stars“ is a book about a girl named Hazel Grace Lancaster who has cancer and is terminally ill. She goes to a support group and meets a boy named Augustus Waters. He does not have cancer anymore and is in remission. They start to hang out more and she introduces him to a book called „An Imperial Affliction“. They set out on a journey to Amsterdam to meet the author of he book and ask him what happens after the book ends. They fall in love but then Augustus gets cancer again and he passes away. He leaves Hazel a note saying he is enjoying their time together and he hopes she did too.

 

Why is the story appropriate for the targeted groups of RSP readers?

1. appropriate for the target group of readers

2. reflects readers' interests

3. the recommendation and the report emerged from the survey results                                  .                                                                           

4. it promotes understanding of people who are (terminally) ill

5. refers to real life situations of ill people

The theme is contemporary and timely, understandable and close to a young reader.

                                   

What are the distinguished readers interests reflected by this book/story?
The intertwining motifs of love, friendship, relationship with parents, the relationship to the illness and the need for a young person's normal life, according to the expressed interests in conducted surveys.

 

Why is this story motivational for the pupils?
It poses  deep existential questions as to what the important things in life are, questions of emotion, the necessity of suffering, the fear of oblivion, the indifference of the universe, the reality of a serious illness, the importance of fiction, concern about friends and family.

 

Is there a historical, political, multi/inter cultural, migrant or similar context recognized in this book/story? 
The context of severe illness is universal and thus encompasses all social groups.

 

Is there a principle of inclusion reflected in this book/story and does it promotes understanding of cultural diversities and heritage? 
The principle of inclusion  is visible in a wide range of everyday situations. All the main characters in the novel are severely ill with some type of cancer. As such, they attend support groups, classes, socialize with people they knew before their illness, meet children who sincerely ask questions about the visible problem of the ill person. How they cope with their situation in relation to other people and vice versa promotes the idea of ​​inclusion and empathy.

Book title
The Great Gatsby

 

Author
F.S.Fitzgerald

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bibliographic information

 

Links (adaptations, reviews, full texts etc.)

 

Theme

The decline of the american dream in the 1920s
On the surface, The Great Gatsby is a story of the love between a man and a woman. The main theme of the novel, however, encompasses a much larger, less romantic scope. Though all of its action takes place over a mere few months during the summer of 1922 and is set in a circumscribed geographical area in the vicinity of Long Island, New York, The Great Gatsby is a highly symbolic meditation on 1920s America as a whole, in particular the disintegration of the American dream in an era of unprecedented prosperity and material excess.

The hollowness of the upper class
One of the major topics explored in The Great Gatsby is the sociology of wealth, specifically, how the newly minted millionaires of the 1920s differ from and relate to the old aristocracy of the country’s richest families.

 

Short summary

The Great Gatsby is the story of eccentric millionaire Jay Gatsby, who is in love Daisy Buchanan. Buchanan has a kept woman, Myrtle, the wife of a long island mechanic. Gatsby, Jay Gatz at the time, and Daisy had once been in love, but Daisy married Tom while Gatsby was in Europe during the Great War. In the aftermath of this, Jay Gatz abandoned his old identity, becoming Jay Gatsby and amassing a fortune with the help of notorious criminal Meyer Wolfsheim.

Gatsby and Daisy begin to see each other secretly. Nick and Gatsby also become close. Buchanan eventually confronts Gatsby in Manhattan about the affair, and the two argue about who it is that Daisy genuinely loves. Daisy claims to love both of them, but she decides to return to Long Island with Gatsby, not her husband. Daisy drives Gatsby’s car, but she accidentally kills a woman on the side of the road, and then speeds off. It turns out that this woman is Buchanan’s girlfriend Myrtle—she had only run out to see the car because she thought it was Buchanan’s.

 

Why is the story appropriate for the targeted groups of RSP readers?

1. appropriate for the target group of readers

2. reflects readers' interests

3. the recommendation and the report emerged from the survey results                                  

4. reflects historical moment of the 1920th in the USA                                                                           

5. it promotes understanding of cultural diversities and heritage                                        

The theme is contemporary, though from the 20s of the last century in America. Reality, understandable to the young reader , with fun-filled entertainment, exotic surroundings, social differences and passionate forbidden love, the vanity of upper class living.
                                  

What are the distinguished readers interests reflected by this book/story?
Gatsby  explores the dream's destructive power. The Great Gatsby also captures money's power to corrupt, to let the rich escape from the consequences of their actions. Here's Fitzgerald's description of that original couple: "They were careless people — Tom and Daisy — they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money …"

 

Why is this story motivational for the pupils?
Eternal themes of crime and tragic love, misunderstanding, alienation, escape from reality, searching for identity, the futility of upper class living

 

Is there a historical, political, multi/inter cultural, migrant or similar context recognized in this book/story? 
Historical period of the 1920s in America, time of crazy fun, accumulating wealth through suspicious business, returning after the war, coping with real life.

 

Is there a principle of inclusion reflected in this book/story and does it promotes understanding of cultural diversities and heritage? 
Roman promotes understanding of cultural differences particularly class differences, ​​encourages thinking about responsibility, the problem of gender relations, the relationship with children.

Book title
My son the Fanatic

 

Author
Hanif Kureishi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bibliographic information

My Son the Fanatic is a short story first published in The New Yorker in 1994. It was reprinted in Kureishi's 1997 collection of short stories, Love in a Blue Time, and also as a supplement to some editions of The Black Album.

  • Country: United Kingdom
  • Language: English
  • Genre: Short story
  • Publisher: Faber and Faber
  • Publication date: 1997
  • Media type: Print (Paperback)
  • ISBN  0-571-17739-5

 

Links (adaptations, reviews, full texts etc.)

 

Theme

The theme of My Son the Fanatic is culture clash. This first displays as intergenerational conflict between a father, Parvez, a Pakistani immigrant, and his son Ali. More significantly, it shows the deep divide in worldview between the secular west and fundamentalist Islam.

 

Short summary

Parvez is a Pakistani immigrant living in England. He works as a taxi driver and has assimilated to Western ways of life. His son, Ali, seems to have embraced the lifestyle of his British peers. Parvez, however, is growing more and more suspicious of his son as he notices apparent changes in Ali's behavior. The taxi driver talks about his worries to his colleagues and to Bettina, a prostitute who has become Parvez's friend. All his "dreams of doing well in England" (which include a happy wedding and a safe job in accountancy for Ali) crumble when his son confesses that he is disgusted by his father's neglect for Muslim precepts about prayers and his father's disregard of the ban on alcohol and pork meat. Increasingly disturbed by his son's religious fundamentalism and contempt for assimilation, Parvez one night repeatedly hits Ali. The son reacts with only a question: "So who's the fanatic now?"

 

Why is the story appropriate for the targeted groups of RSP readers?

1. Reflects political/historical moment.                                                                              

2. Promotes understanding of cultural diversities and heritage                                         

3. Refers to actual migrant situation

                                  

What are the distinguished readers interests reflected by this book/story?
Even though published in 1994, Kurieshi's story speaks to a reality with which the world is struggling today. The issue of so-called "radicalized" youth concerns many people in our world today.  "My Son, the Fanatic" insists that when we encounter that which is different, we must try to understand it. The particular generation, the one to which Ali belongs, is uniquely different from all others.  They possess language and cultural skills that their parents did not.  At the same time, they have become aware that the singular and surface based pursuits of their parents' generation.

 

Why is this story motivational for the pupils?
As several binary oppositions are reversed, the story can  be interpreted on several levels and students can learn that no reading can ever be complete or finished. They will be motivated to read it more than once.

 

Is there a historical, political, multi/inter cultural, migrant or similar context recognized in this book/story? 
In the broadest terms, New Historicism uses literature to try to reconstruct or understand the social or intellectual history or "feel" of a particular period. This can be applied to this story in order to understand what it was like to be a Pakistani immigrant or child of immigrants in England in the 1980s and early 1990s.

 

Is there a principle of inclusion reflected in this book/story and does it promotes understanding of cultural diversities and heritage? 
From the very first sentence, "Surreptitiously, the father began going into his son's room," readers become accomplices of the father and closely identify with his point of view and his bewilderment at his son's fundamentalism. Readers would normally expect to see the old generation tied to ethnic and religious traditions; second-generation immigrants would be more keen to assimilate. This process of subverting readers' expectations is carried to the extreme as Kureishi's short story ends with no immediate closure and no reassurance of any possible resolution in the future. Theories of hybridity aim at breaking open traditional, inadequate dependencies on binary pairs which are used to generate rigid ordering-systems. By contrast, Kureishi aim at constructing more fluid, flexible ordering system which reflects the individual's personality and is conductive to more openness, mutability, and tolerance. In his texts, the author constantly question the hierarchical binaries on which we base our assumptions about race, class, and gender.

From this point of view, the development of the principle of inclusion and understanding of cultural differences and inheritances in today's students population is a priority.

Book title
Indian Camp

 

Author
Ernest Hemingway

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bibliographic information

 

Links (adaptations, reviews, full texts etc.)

 

Theme
The themes are childbirth and fear of death.

 

Short summary
The story begins in the pre-dawn hours as the young Nick Adams, his father, his uncle and their Indian guides row across a lake to a nearby Indian camp. Nick's father, a doctor, has been called out to deliver a baby for a woman who has been in labor for days. At the camp, they find the woman in a cabin lying on a bottom bunkbed; her husband lies above her with an injured foot. Nick's father is forced to perform a caesarian operation on the woman with a jack-knife; he asks Nick to assist. The woman screams throughout the operation. After the baby is delivered, Nick's father turns to the woman's husband on the top bunk and finds that he fatally slit his throat with a straight razor during the operation. The story ends with only Nick and his father on the lake, rowing away from the camp. Nick asks his father questions about birth and death, and thinks to himself that he will never die, as he watches his father row.

 

Why is the story appropriate for the targeted groups of RSP readers?

1. appropriate for the target group of readers

2. reflects readers interests

3. the recommendation and the report emerged from the survey results                                  

4. reflects political/historical moment.                                                                              

5. it promotes understanding of cultural diversities and heritage                                        

6. refers to actual minority situation

The main character is a young boy assisting his father while helping a women in labour. Honoured to have been invited and asked to help he confronts the real adult world although outside his own social surrounding.

                                  

What are the distinguished readers interests reflected by this book/story?
The  motifs of entering the world of adults through assisting a professional doctor at delivering a baby. Being adult enough to be invited by your father, to go along and give him a hand.

 

Why is this story motivational for the pupils?
It raises questions about the fear of death, the treatment of women, tolerance to another person's  suffering. The boy faces the world of adults.

 

Is there a historical, political, multi/inter cultural, migrant or similar context recognized in this book/story? 
There is a historical and political context of Native Americans living conditions as well as the status of women.

 

Is there a principle of inclusion reflected in this book/story and does it promotes understanding of cultural diversities and heritage? 
The principle of inclusion reflected on all pages of the novel strongly and deeply promotes the idea of coexistence, supporting diversity and differency, empathy, acceptance and understanding of cultural differences, historical and social heritage.

  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1  2  3  4  5  6 
  •  Next 
  •  End 

Page 1 of 6

Login form:

Go to top