Title of Activity
Towards a Cosmopolitan Readership / Trojan Horse

 

Description of educational activity
Duration: 45 minutes

Pupils' age: 15-18

Classroom organization: group work (6 x 4 students)

Objective: to improve the student's reading literacy and ability to understand text, ability to reflect, critical thinking and empathy. It also aims at developing key competencies and transversal skills (critical thinking, taking initiatives, solving problems, participating in collective work ...) that enable students to critically observe and decode the cultural, social use of languages; cultivating reading culture by creating a readily motivating environment that improves personal reading quality. Enhancement of communication skills, interpretation, analysis and evaluation skills.

 

Working materials: summary  handouts

Activiites:

  1. Ss are divided in 6  groups.
  2. They are given handouts with 6 jumbled paragraphs of the summary to put  them in chronological order.
  3. In the last two paragraphs the names of the main characters, Hazel and Augustus, have been deleted so the Ss will have to finish the story as they see it, filling the gapfills with the names.
  4. Once when they have the paragraphs ordered and the plot with their ending  ready, they will have to imagine the dialogue between the characters for each of the paragraphs.

They are given the quotes reffering to different characters.

  1. The Ss will present the novel with their ending in the way that one S takes part of the narrator  and other Ss  act out the dialogues

 

Handouts:

  1. Hazel Grace Lancaster is trying to live the normal life of a 16-year-old girl, but she is also struggling with what it will be like for her parents after she dies. While Hazel attends a church support group for cancer survivors, she meets a boy that is one year older than her, Augustus Waters. While Augustus had a type of cancer that causes him to lose his leg and wear a prosthetic, it also has a survival rate that is much higher than Hazel's death sentence.

 

 

  1. From the first day that Hazel meets Augustus, the two are practically inseparable. Augustus has been in remission after losing his leg some years ago, so Hazel hesitates in starting a relationship with him, not wanting to hurt him if her illness takes another turn for the worse The basis of their relationship ends up being Hazel's favorite book, „ An Imperial Affliction". She requires Augustus to read it and in turn, he requires her to read the book that is the basis of his favorite video game.

 

  1. Hazel relates to the character in her favorite book, Anna, because Anna has a rare blood cancer. Augustus and Hazel bond over the book because both of them of a burning desire to find out how the story ends because the author stops the book before providing conclusion on what happens to each of the characters.

 

  1. Augustus joins Hazel's pursuit of the book's author, Peter Van Houten, to provide the answers that they need. Augustus even uses a wish foundation to fly him and Hazel to Amsterdam, where the author lives, to talk with him in person. They are able to take this trip, but when they arrive to meet the author he is drunk and surly.

 

  1. While ___________ is the one that is doomed to die, __________ ends up telling ____________ that at the recent scan, the doctors discovered that ______ (her/his) entire body is filled with cancer. _______ spends the last months of  ________'s life caring for ______(her/him) and loving _____(him/her).

 

  1. The author attends  _________'s funeral and tries to apologize to ___________;  he reveals that his book, which is about a young girl with cancer, was based on his daughter who died of leukemia . ___________copes with ____________'s death, comforting ________ (himself/herself) with the strength of  ______ (her/his)  family and a letter about ______  (him/her) that  _________ sent to the author before _______(her/his) death.

 

Evaluation and assessment method:

Students independently demonstrate and fully substantiate their attitudes and results in the course of their work.

The impact of RSP reading activities:

Practices that support and encourage students’ choice, opinion and attitude. The idea and the choice are personal and there is no mistake, and the positive understanding of thinking and thinking affects the students' confidence and lose previous reading resistance and gradually gain readership competence.

 

 

Connection to curriculum

Stage: 3rd grade of high school

General grammar school programme: The aim of the curriculum for the study of literature and the areas of civic education is related to the reading and understanding of more literary texts on interpersonal relationships and differences between healthy and severely ill people.

Pupils should independently discern, isolate, explain, demonstrate the features of the text offered and argue their outlook on the influence of culture, family and society on the development of the personality of a young man suffering from terminal illness and his rights to daily life of a young person regardless of illness.

 

 

Knowledge:

  • Autonomously access text from different perspectives.
  • Learn to initiate a discussion and ask questions.
  • Develop ease and readiness of reading.
  • Enhance the understanding of reading comprehension.
  • Organize and suspend different types of information.

 

Skills:

  • Observe, counteract, distinguish, and comment on the similarities and differences in appearance in the text.
  • Develop the prediction skills and ability to imagine possible situational solutions.
  • Develop and enrich Communication Skills.
  • Construct, conclude and evaluate.
  • Learn to work effectively, independently and equally in the group.

 

Competence:

  • Establish links between the world in text and real life or personal experiences.
  • Be able to visualize, combine, intervene in material.
  • Follow the instructions and tasks to be able to evaluate the results.
  • Evaluate evidence and arguments, support and justify choices.

 

 

Bibliographic reference to be used during the activity

John Green

The Fault in Our Stars

 

Slikovni rezultat za the fault in our stars image

 

Digital sources

 

Results

Expected Outcomes:

  • Students acquire the lifelong ability of reading, interpreting and evaluating a literary text with the theme of life's disadvantages of severely ill people;
  • the ability to develop an understanding of literal and implicit meaning, irony and sarcasm, relevant contexts, and deeper issues and attitudes expressed in literary works;
  • a competent personal response to the subject of the literary work they have studied;
  • solving different tasks from different perspectives; the research of broader and universal questions suggested through the literary work;
  • a conscious grasp of life's realities and everyday faces with hard-sick young people, developed empathy and a better understanding of themselves and the world around them.

 

Recommendations

Choosing a method of teaching and a suitable text affect the increase of the student's interest in reading, studying the interpretation.

Independence in work, effective co-operation, involvement in discussion and appraisal encourage interests and develop analytical and synthetic skills.

The volume of texts can be tailored to the opportunities and interests of the group as needed, according to the RSP readership profile.

The more active approach and the smaller text fragments offer a more interesting, dynamic way of reading and studying a literary work.

Title of Activity
INDIAN CAMP, Ernest Hemingway

 

Description of educational activity
Duration: 1 X 45 minutes

Pupils’ age: 15-19

Organization of the class of pupils: group work

The aim of the lesson: The aim of the lesson is to motivate the students to read in the way that reading comprehension enables them to understand the relations between the characters – white doctor and an Indian woman suffering, the issue of struggling and enduring pain.....

Another goal is to enable Ss develop their miming skill to present a story according the given guidelines without having read it.

Ss will gain knowledge and understanding of a famous 20 century writer and his opus of short stories.

Support materials:

Handouts :

  • a short summary
  • characters description
  • guidelines for pantomime

 

Activities:

  1. The Ss are divided in two groups – The “mime” and the “readers”
  2. The  mime group is given the handouts – they are going to mime the story
  3. The “readers” group is going to “read” the interpretation
  4. The  mime group Ss read the guidelines and pick a role
  5. The mime group gets 3- 5’ to read the guidelines
  6. The mime Ss present the story
  7. The readers “read” what the actors are presenting
  8. All Ss are given the story to read and check whether they have understood the plot.

 

Evaluation and assessment method:

Throughout the lesson, the Ss will be very active to present  VS understand the mime.

Teacher’s role - monitoring Ss’ work, their interaction,  reading for details,  making notes, and participation in group activities.

In order to evaluate and assess the effective impact of the previous activities upon the students, they are asked to elaborate a short paper in no more than 5 minutes where they make an In-depth analysis of the main characters and their relationships

 

Effect of the activity on RSP reading: Practices that support students´ choice, collaboration, and shared control of learning outcomes can be linked to self-expressed interest in reading and engaged reading behaviours.

Teachers can organize reading instruction to develop self-efficiency, competence, and engagement in teenage students.

 

 

Connection to curriculum

Grade: 3rd grade

Curriculum:

Civic education – responsible behaviour, developing empathy, understanding the position of deprived minority women, (in)ability to endure someone’s suffering, fear, growing up,

World Literature -  classics works of art - reading and valuing

History – Indian culture , related to reality,

 

Knowledge:

  • Understand the relationships in  different culture
  • Develop reading fluency
  • Improve reading comprehension
  • Organise information in a specific way

 

Skills:

  • Use handouts incentive
  • Make predictions
  • Compare and contrast
  • Summarize
  • Work effectively in groups, cooperation

 

 

 

Competences:

  • Make connections between unknown culture and your own
  • Be able to visualise material read
  • Follow  instructions and present them visually
  • Evaluate evidence
  • Support and justify an opinion

 

Bibliographic reference to be used during the activity

Ernest Hemingway

Indian Camp

Publisher: 

ISBN:

Page count:

Year of issue:

 

 

Digital sources

-

 

Results

The expected outcomes of the lesson are:

The students will be able:

  • to understand the task by reading the guidelines.
  • to connect ideas.
  • to present different characters, 
  • to make connections and make a story,
  • to evaluate the relationship between the characters,
  • to justify their reactions
  • to speculate,
  • to interpret.
  •  

 

Recommendations

Both the teaching method and the text can help in increasing Ss’ interest in reading. This text promotes the consciousness of  treating a minority group members.

The teacher monitors the students so as to make sure they cooperate effectively.

The short story  can be adapted to the language level of a group – it can be shorter - by cutting less important sentences regarding descriptions, or be expanded to additional fragments of the same short story. Students can be offered a glossary of difficult vocabulary.

Title of Activity
GREAT GATSBY- Who is responsible for Gatsby’s death?

 

Description of educational activity
Duration: 2 X 45 minutes

Pupils’ age: 15-19

Organization of the class of pupils: group work

The aim of the lesson: The aim of the lesson is to motivate the students to read in the way that reading comprehension enables them to understand the relations between the characters and understand the responsibilities one has when it comes to serious situations with death consequences.

Another goal is to enable Ss develop their speaking skill to express and defend their point of view.

Ss will gain knowledge and understanding of a famous 20 century novel.

 

Support materials:

  • “The Great Gatsby” film clipping to give the incentive for the task.
  • there are 4 sets of excerpts from the book The Great Gatsby – to do with the four main characters. Students have to define  in what way they were responsible for Gatsby’s death.

1st set DAISY

2nd set TOM

3rd set GATSBY

4th set MYRTLE

The excerpts are attached.

 

Activities:

1. The Ss are divided into 4 groups of 5.

2. The Ss watch the final scene from the movie – the killing of the main character.

3. Each group gets a picture from the movie of a character with the name on it.

4. Each group gets different excerpts from the book The Great Gatsby about the character form the picture. Each student reads one excerpt and after having read it, reports to the groups what he has learned from it. Their task as a group, after having read and reported on these excerpts to be able to

  • describe the character
  • understand the relationship with the main character
  • identify and define the responsibility towards his death
  • to justify their decision

 

5. each groups gets  5’ to read  and report among themselves.

6. Discussion: The students are enabled to interact, to discuss within the group, to argue for or against an opinion.

 

Evaluation and assessment method:

Throughout the lesson, the Ss will give their reasons for their opinion with accurate supporting details.

Teacher’s role - monitoring Ss’ work, their interaction, reading for details, making notes, and participation in group activities.

In order to evaluate and assess the effective impact of the previous activities upon the students, they are asked to elaborate a short paper in no more than 5 minutes where they make an In-depth analysis of the main character.

Effect of the activity on RSP reading: 

Practices that support students´ choice, collaboration, and shared control of learning outcomes can be linked to self-expressed interest in reading and engaged reading behaviours.

Teachers can organize reading instruction to develop self-efficiency, competence, and engagement in teenage students.

 

 

Connection to curriculum

Grade: 4th

Curriculum:

Civic education – responsible behaviour, developing empathy, foreseeing consequences

World Literature -  classics works of art - reading and valuing

History – post-war situation , consequences, related to reality, going back to real life

 

Knowledge:

  • Understand the difference between dreams and real life
  • Develop reading fluency
  • Improve reading comprehension
  • Organise information in a specific way

 

Skills:

  • Use video incentive
  • Distinguish  ethical and non ethical behaviour
  • Make predictions
  • Compare and contrast
  • Summarize
  • Work effectively in groups, respecting others

 

Competences:

  • Make connections between fiction and real life or personal experiences
  • Be able to visualise material read
  • Follow specific instructions and conventions
  • Evaluate evidence
  • Support and justify an opinion

 

Bibliographic reference to be used during the activity

F.S.Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby

Publisher:  The ebooks at Planet ebook.com

ISBN:

Page count: 193

Year of issue:

 

 

Digital sources

-

 

Results

The expected outcomes of the lesson. The students will be able:

  • to understand the task by reading the extracts.
  • to connect ideas and themes across texts.
  • to offer character descriptions, 
  • to make connections,
  • to evaluate the relationship between the characters,
  • to justify their reactions
  • to speculate,
  • to interpret,
  • to make decisions and define the task  in response to the excerpts.

 

Recommendations

Both the teaching method and the text can help in increasing Ss’ interest in reading. This text promotes the consciousness of responsibility towards other people and ourselves.

The teacher monitors the students so as to make sure they cooperate effectively.

The volume of given fragments of books can be adapted to the language level of a group - fragments can be shorter - by cutting less important paragraphs, or be expanded to additional fragments of the same novel.

Title of Activity
"Marionettes, Inc.", Ray Bradbury

 

Description of educational activity
Duration: 1 x 45 minutes

Students’ age: 15-19

Class organization: group work

Lesson aims:

The aim of the lesson is to motivate students to read in a way that reading comprehension enables them to understand the relationship between characters - married partners, humans and robots; reflection on the issues of responsibility to the other, the question of making decisions and the consequences of the decisions themselves, the willingness to face the possibility or the inability to make the wishes and dreams come true.

The other goal is to enable Ss to develop their ability to design and develop a plot in a story based on reading the fragments.

Ss will gain the knowledge and understanding of a famous 20th century writer and his short-story opus from the SF area from the mid-20th century.

 

Handouts:

 - excerpts

 - situation description .....

 

Activities:

 

1.    Students individually consider the issues and  expose their views in public:

- what is their dream or desire

- what would they be willing to do to make that dream or desire come true ?

 

2.     Ss  work in groups of 4-5 .

Ss  read the 1st excerpt:

From the beginning of the story

till the sentences: 

"...She won't know I'm gone. I'll be back in a month and no one the wiser, except you."

 

Short  summary of the excerpt:

From the conversation between two friends Smith and Brailing, they find out about their lives. They find that Brailing married 10 years ago almost against his will because of family relations. By choosing a marriage instead of traveling to Rio his life dream remains unfulfilled. Now, after 10 years of marriage, he plans to go to Rio without his wife, and she will not even notice that him  not being home for a month. The reading ends when Brailing is about to reveal how he is going to do it.

After having read the excerpt, the students have to guess how Brailing will disappear for a month without  his wife  noticing his absence.

Ss in groups publicly present their plot versions

 

3.  Students read the 2nd  excerpt from the story  from the sentence:

 

 “Hello, Braling,” he said.  

till the  sentence  

 "... From $7,600 to our $15,000 de luxe model..."

 

 

Reading it they reveal the original plan of the plot.

       - they compare the actual plot with their solutions.

        - tind find "FOR" and "AGAINST" arguments for such a decision by the main character, focusing on different aspects - ethical, humane, emotional, etc.

 

4.   Students read the 3rd  excerpt from the sentence:

 ...“Well, it’s the cellar box for you, B-Two.”

till the sentence

...“Don’t run!”

 

That is the moment when B2 defends his right to a full life and denies obedience to B1.

 Students in the groups guess how the potential problem between B1 and B2 will be solved.

 

5.  After presenting their final solutions to this problem, the students get the final excerpt to read  and find the actual development of the story.

 

From the sentence

„Braling Two said, “I’m going to put you in the box, lock it, and lose the key. “

tlil the end of the story.

 

 

6.  We divide the students into 3 groups representing 3 characters: Brailing 1, Brailing 2 and wife of B1. Within the group, they elaborate how their character will expose and defend their right to freedom of choice and decision.

 

For example:

B1 - his right to a fullfiling his dream

B2 - his right to the full life of a human being

The  wife - her right to a life in marriage, love, sharing, loyalty ...

 

7.   Conclusion - Discussion:

- Does the  aim justify the means?

- How far does personal freedom go?

- Making decisions - responsibility

- Confronting the consequences of their decisions

 

Evaluation methods :

During the lesson, the students will be very active in guessing and designing as well as presenting their plots.

 The Role of Teachers - monitoring the mork of students, their interaction, reading for details, making notes and participating in collective activities.

In order toevaluate  the effective effects of previous activities on the students, they are asked to make a short presentation, in no more than 5 minutes, in which to make a profound analysis of the main characters and their relationships

 

The Impact of RSP Reading Activity:

Practices that support students's choice, collaboration, and joint learning outcomes control can be associated with self-addressed reading interest and engaging reading behavior.

Teachers can organize reading lessons to develop self-sufficiency, competence and engagement in teens.

 

 

Connection to curriculum

Grade: 3rd

Curriculum:

Civic education - responsible behaviour, empathy development, understanding of gender relations, (dis) ability to make decisions, dealing with the consequences of their own decisions

World Literature - 20st SF- Reading and Evaluation

History - the development of modern technologies

 

Knowledge:

  • Understand relationships in fictional SF situations and compare them with real life situations
  • Develop fluent reading
  • Improve understanding by reading
  • Organize information in a certain way

 

Skills:

  • Use handouts incentives
  • Guess
  • Compare and contrast
  • Summarize
  • Work effectively in groups, cooperate

 

Competencies:

  • Establishing the link between SF culture and our own
  • Ability to visualize the read material
  • Follow the instructions and devise the plot
  • Evaluate decisions and reflect on the consequences of these
  • Support and justify attitudes

 

 

Bibliographic reference to be used during the activity

Ray Bradbury

"Marionettes, Inc.

 

http://www.angelfire.com/or/grace/marionettes.html

 

Editor: 

ISBN:

Number of pages:

Year od issue: 1949

Related image

 

 

 

Results

Students will be able to:

  • Understand the task by reading the guidelines.
  • design a plot,
  • show different views,
  • link and design stories of different characters,
  • assess the relationship between characters,
  • justify their reactions and decisions,
  • to awaken the subtleties of certain decisions
  • guess,
  • interpret.

 

 

Recommendations

Teaching method and the text can help increase students’ interest in reading. This text encourages awareness of human relationships and helper robots.

The teacher monitors students to ensure they work effectively.

A short story can be adjusted to the language level of the group - it may be shorter - by cutting less important phrases related to descriptions or extending to additional fragments of the same short story. Students can be offered a glossary of difficult words.

Title of Activity
Towards a Cosmopolitan Readership / Trojan Horse

 

Description of educational activity
Duration: 3 x 45 minutes

Pupils’ age: 17-18

Organization of the class of pupils: group work

The aim of the lesson:

- Involving the students in the simple mechanics of creating meaning my means of binary oppositions

- Development of empathy, through re-creation of a character’s voice and thoughts

 

Support materials:

  • Internet
  • Life-style magazines

Handouts :

  • 3 text
  • cue cards

 

Activities:

Reading, interpreting, and discussing text is preceded by

  1. Pre-reading activities

which provide motivation and background information to facilitate reading and enable students to put Kureishi into a wider, non-literary as well as literary context.

 

1. The students are divided in groups (3). Each group, according to the interests of its members, takes on the task of collecting, selecting and evaluating information on a specific topic related to Kureishi.

2. Thus, as with the puzzle, each group adds its piece of information in order to gain more comprehensive view of the author and prepare the ground for an encounter with the text.

 

Suggestion of thematic angles:

  1. Sex & Drugs & Rock ’n’ Roll” approach:

Students are provided (or find information on the Internet) with material on changes in rock music during 1980s and 1990s. A focus is on shift from glam rock (David Bowie) to punk rock (Sex Pistols). Additionally, depending on the class, changing in sexual mores, fashion, leisure activities etc. Since students tend to get side-tracked into presenting either pot-pourri of 1980s and 1990s pop phenomena or exhibiting encyclopaedic knowledge of this era, Teachers should make sure that the focus stays on music and a reflection of its age, especially of shifting social phenomena such as attitudes towards authority, material success, social issues, sexuality or gender constructions.

  1. The Pop Star Kureishi” approach:

Students learn about Kureishi as a ‘cultural icon’ and celebrity, about his views on literature, race, sex, family. The best source is his website (http://www.hanifkureishi.com). This fosters a true human interes angle, for Kureishi’s star quality is not to be underestimated in today’s ‘promotional’ culture. To make the most of it, students can embellish classroom walls with author's posters.

  1. The “Kureishi’s books as regions studie(s)” approach

Here students research the most important facts and figures about contemporary Britain’s ethnic minority groups. This provides the factual background to Kureishi’s fictions. Teacher should encourage students to go beyond enumerating statistics and research how minority groups actually experience life in Great Britain.

  1. The “If a Man is Tired of London…” approach

Since most of Kureishi’s novels and short stories are set in London, students are given the task of doing research about London – with special emphases on matters of class, ethnic minority groups, and ‘in places’. In developing thir own ‘mental maps’, students learn about one of the main categories of recent cultural-studies interests: the construction of ‘space’ (urban vs. rural space; suburbia vs. the city) as means of fashioning identity.

After preparatory activities, students will be able to connect their reading of story with various strands of ‘cultural knowledge’, thus creating a more lasting and increasingly tightly woven ‘web of knowledge’. Their involvement with Kureishi will not take place in mental vacuum; rather they will be able constantly to link literature, film, music art etc. with previously acquired knowledge.

This task aims at more cognitive objectives.

 

  1. Reading activity

1.The groups are given the handouts – they are going to read:

  • the “restaurant episode” narrated by Parvez in retrospect.
  • the episode with Betina
  • the episode with mother

 

 

3. Post- reading activities

Designed to introduce students to some of the mechanisms of othering (theories of postcolonialism), alterity or discourse analysis.  As some of the arguments are only reported in indirect speech and some issues of the debate are just hinted at in the passage, students are asked to fill in the arguments in this ‘standoff’ between fundamentalist son and westernized father revolving around Ali’s accusation of his father: “You are too implicated in Western civilisation”.

 

Two methods of working with literary text are suggested by taking the students off the page, responding to them by turning them into performance and role play.

Here not only oral skills, reading skills, skills in extemporising and improvising are promoted, but also awareness of the role of non-verbal features such as gestures and body language in communication. Drama work (holistic in its scope) aims at fostering a stronger sense of involvement, thus helpings to motivate students and encourage them to learn through active participation.

The staging of the following activities encourages students to get involved in the controversial debate about opposing value systems.

 

Activity 1: Turning the restaurant scene into a tableau

Frozen tableaux or sculpting scenes enhance students’ understanding of literary text. Students can visualize the scene depicted by taking on the roles of the characters and can create character constellations by interpreting the relationships between the protagonists involved; in order to create a composite picture expressing all the features and relations of the characters.

A number of frozen tableau activities can be put into practice. All exercises should avoid contortions, as students must be able to hold their pose for a minute or so.

  1. Frozen tableau involving one sculptor

The teacher asks his students. “We need someone to shape us into a picture”. A volunteer comes forward. “Right, you may bring the characters into your sculpture in any order.” The volunteer decides who will represent Ali and Parvez, Bettina, and Parvez’s nameless wife (Ali’s mother). No one may speak and the characters must be physically loose and pliable. The sculptor moduls them into the image by placing them in the group, curling a little finger here, tilting a head there, turning the corner of ones character’s mouth, etc. Then students discuss what this sculpture reveals about the individual character’s personality and the relationship between the characters.

  1. …… involving more sculptors

No sculptor is chosen, but the students enter the tableau, one at the time. They themselves decide which character from the tekst they represent. They may ‘sculpt’ any alterations they may wish to those already assembled. Again, there must be no spoken instructions or requests; everything must be sculpted.

  1. Using tableaux based on quotations

Students are sent off in pairs (Ali, Parvez) or in groups of four (including Bettina and mother/wife) with their texts to choose a significant quotation from the text scene (for instance, when Ali rejects alcohol, “But it is forbidden”). After carefull discussin of the line, students must find a physical way of presenting it to the rest of the group, who will try to guess the actual quotation.

  1. Speaking tableau

After activities one and/or two the students describe how they feel towards the other characters of the tableau.

 

Activity 2: Re-enacting the restaurant scene with the help of cue cards

Using cue cards as a useful method of furthering students’ skills in improvisation and impromptu speech. It is a sort of ‘guided task’ during which students respond to stimuli and create, as in this case, an exchange of opinions and ideas. The restaurant scene would seem to be an ideal scenario for such an exercise, as father and son confront each other with conflicting opinions, ranging from concrete things (drink, pork etc.) to abstract ideas (attitudes towards women, religion etc.). Students may be asked to make a list of the ‘bones of contention’ which are bound to come up during such confrontation – apart from the matters mentioned in the text. Then they act out the confrontation. Two students sit down at the table; other students may remain standing behind them, providing them with cues and prompts or acting as Bettina and mother/wife. Then the ‘waiter’ hands the actors cue cards – each time Ali or Parvez voices his or her opinion on the subject-matter presented to them. To help students slip into their roles, it is advisable to start with tangible, actual things first and then go on to more abstract matters. The goal is to make students ‘slip into a role’ and present opinions on a range of issues in consistent manner. Here we have a debating society of sorts, but with a difference. Cue cards could first prompt responses on alcohol, pork, cigarettes, Western movies, whores, or amenities of Western life-styles. Then they could elict responses to the father’s plans for his son: school, stereo equipment, VCR, computers, girlfriend, sports, or college. Increasingly, the conversation could turn to general issues such as assimilation vs. separation, or fitting in vs. fundamentalism. Students should also be encouraged to find an ending to this performance, culminating in reconciliation or separation. After the performance, students should discuss not only the pros and cons of the arguments presented, but also how they felt about this performance.

Did it create more tolerance? Did it reconfirm existing prejudices? They might also go on to speculate about Ali’s reasons for becoming a fundamentalist (only hinted in the text).

 

Evaluation and assessment method:

Teacher’s role – provide materials and and act as mediator or facilitator

In order to evaluate and assess the effective impact of the previous activities upon the students, they are asked to finish reading the story and elaborate a short paper in no more than 5 minutes bringing the final conclusions about its end.

 

Students are assessed on their ability to demonstrate:

  • knowledge of the content and form of literary text from different countrie and culture
  • engagement with writers’ ideas and treatment of themes
  • appreciation of how texts relate to wider contexts
  • recognition and appreciation of how writers create and shape meanings and effects
  • empathy, through re-creation of a character’s voice and thoughts

 

 

Effect of the activity on RSP reading: Practices innitiate thought-processes in the students´ minds leading to what could be called greater cultural sensitivity, a heightened awareness of both cultural differences and cultural commonalities – and this applies not just to race, but also to gender, class etc.

 

Connection to curriculum

Grade: 4

Curriculum:

World Literature: postcolonial theories vs. theories of hybridity

Civic education – developing conflict resolution strategies (Building Civic Literacy through Talking Points and Writing Prompts)

History & Geography – Pakistan culture and religion; Migrations and Intercultural permeation

English language and literature

Architecture in Art - the construction of ‘space’ (urban vs. rural space; suburbia vs. the city) as means of fashioning identity.  

 

Knowledge:

  • Wider and universal issues
  • Better understanding of themselves and of the world around them
  • Enjoy the experience of reading world literature
  • Understand and respond to literary texts in different forms and from different countries and cultures
  • Different ways in which writers achieve their effects
  • Literature’s contribution to aesthetic, imaginative and intellectual growth
  • Contribution of literature to an understanding of areas of human concern
  • Critical thinking about the world, interdependency between people from different continents

 

Skills:

  • Collecting, selecting and evaluating background informations
  • Read, interpret and evaluate literary texts from different countries and cultures
  • Develop an understanding of literal and implicit meaning, relevant contexts and of the deeper themes or attitudes that may be expressed
  • Present an informed, personal response to literary text
  • Communicate an informed personal response appropriately and effectively
  • Practice and reinforce prosocial behaviors
  • Work/cooperate effectively in groups
  • Skills of empathy
  • Performance and role play skills
  • Skills in improvisation and impromptu speech
  • Learning through active participation
  • Debating

Competences:

  • Intercultural communicative competences
  • Understanding of cultures as comprehensive literacy approach.
  • Appreciating distinct modes of thinking/praying/dressing or behaving, in an open-minded and tolerant way

 

Bibliographic reference to be used during the activity

Author           Hanif Kureishi

Country         United Kingdom

Language     English

Genre Short story

Publisher      Faber and Faber

Publication date

1997

Media type    Print (Paperback)

ISBN  0-571-17739-5

 

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41FkDY0y0rL.jpgNaslovnica

 

Digital sources

 

Results

The expected outcomes of the lesson:

The students will be able to demonstrate:

  • clear critical/analytical understanding of the authors’ intentions and the texts’ deeper implications and the attitudes it displays
  • make much well-selected reference to the text
  • respond sensitively and in detail to the way language works in the text
  • communicate a considered and reflective personal response to the text.
  • sustain a perceptive and convincing response with well-chosen detail of narrative and situation

 

Recommendations

Both the teaching method and the text can help in increasing RSP readers interest in reading; enhance their…

Mechanics of creating meaning my means of binary oppositions can be apply later on whole story to achieve new skills in unravelling meanings in text.

Book title
„The Emperor's New Clothes“ (a modern art fairy tale)

„Kejserens nye Klæder" (Denmark, 1837.)

 

Author
Hans Christian Andersen

 

Bibliographic information
https://www.abebooks.com/Emperors-New-Clothes-Ladybird-Favourite-Tales/18293017067/bd

The Emperor's New Clothes : (Ladybird Favourite Tales) :

Hans Christian Andersen,

ISBN 10: 0721415563 / ISBN 13: 9780721415567

Published by Ladybird 25/03/1999, 1999

Hans Christian Andersen (/ˈændərsən/; Danish: [hanˀs ˈkʁæsdjan ˈɑnɐsn̩]), often referred to in Scandinavia as H. C. Andersen (2 April 1805 – 4 August 1875), was a Danish author. Although a prolific writer of plays, travelogues, novels and poems, Andersen is best remembered for his fairy tales. Andersen's popularity is not limited to children: his stories express themes that transcend age and nationality. Andersen's fairy tales, of which no fewer than 3381 works have been translated into more than 125 languages, have become culturally embedded in the West's collective consciousness, readily accessible to children, but presenting lessons of virtue and resilience in the face of adversity for mature readers as well. Some of his most famous fairy tales include "The Emperor's New Clothes", "The Little Mermaid", "The Nightingale", "The Snow Queen", "The Ugly Duckling", "Thumbelina", and many others. In 1835, Andersen published the first two installments of his Fairy Tales (Danish: Eventyr; lit. "fantastic tales"). More stories, completing the first volume, were published in 1837. The collection comprises nine tales, including "The Tinderbox", "The Princess and the Pea", "Thumbelina", "The Little Mermaid" and "The Emperor's New Clothes".

 

Links (adaptations, reviews, full texts etc.)

 

Theme
A modern art fairy tale with elements of anti fairy tale. Theme and motives: greed and conceit of the authority, human greed and selfishness, arrogance, narcissism and stupidity of the ruling class and the naivety of common people, manipulation, deceit and fraudulence, the childrens “voice of naivety” (the truth), truth doesn’t always win.

 

Short summary
"The Emperor's New Clothes" (Danish: Kejserens nye Klæder) is a short tale written by Danish author Hans Christian Andersen, about two fraudulent weavers who promise an emperor a new suit of clothes that they say is invisible to those who are unfit for their positions, stupid, or incompetent – while in reality, they make no clothes at all, making everyone believe the clothes are invisible to them. When the emperor parades before his subjects in his new "clothes", no one dares to say that they do not see any suit of clothes on him for fear that they will be seen as stupid.  The people observed the naked and pompous emperor in wonder and silence, with fake admiration, all until a single child yelled: “The emperor is naked!”. Everybody heard the truth being spoken, but nothing has changed. The emperor resumed his strut with even more pride.

 

 

Why is the story appropriate for the targeted groups of RSP readers?

This story is appropriate for the targeted group because of it’s modern fairy tale/anti fairy take genre. This timeless, literary stylized story stimulates a discussion and analysis of selfishness, deceit and greed not only of the ruling class, but also of the individual, political opportunism, manipulation of the consciousness through modern technology th. en and now, the creation of a “virtual attire”, the imperative of beauty and image and everything that calls for a critical rethinking of our society’s standards.

According to polls, the targeted groups of RSP readers are prone to themes of social activism and this tale changes the usual rules of a fairy tale and the happy ending, impinging deeply into the social issues of the relationship between the ruler and the people, wealth, power and manipulations of the masses. There are also other relatable themes to the readers such as: social differences, the psychology of the masses, selfishness and egoism of the ruling class, the lack of empathy, political conformism, the selfie phenomenon of self-obsession, modern egoism, wide spread narcissism and disrupted moral, social and aesthetic values. The story is highly motivational because it’s both timeless and reflective of the serious issues of the current political moment in history.

 

What are the distinguished readers interests reflected by this book/story?
The readers will recognize the classical values in the contemporary form, to compare and valorise the stereotypical and original, to deepen the awareness of modern literature, postmodernism and to develop a critical relationship according to contemporary social challenges and issues.

 

Why is this story motivational for the pupils?
The story is extremely motivating for students because they can recognize themselves in many of the personal situations, through an exceptionally good and innovative style, skilfully embedded in the richness and depth of the prose, with close-knit and fresh young humorous and ironic discourse.

 

Is there a historical, political, multi/inter cultural, migrant or similar context recognized in this book/story? 
Through this story the pupils can recognize the historical and political context of egoism and the manipulation of the potentate, the expanding social differences, the immoral abuse of social resources, the inability to properly punish delinquency, the fatalistic acceptance of the current situations and the preconceived inability to make changes, the manipulation of political and commercial marketing through modern virtual procedures and technologies and other common social issues of today.

Is there a principle of inclusion reflected in this book/story and does it promotes understanding of cultural diversities and heritage? 
The principle of inclusiveness is covered in the entire novel, convincingly and strongly promoting the ideas of coexistence, criticism of nationalism and chauvinism, the idea of ​​restoring tragically broken relationships, respect and support for differences and the different individuals, empathy, acceptance and understanding of cultural differences. Characters and events represent close and historically driven social and cultural heritage.

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